A Science-Fiction “Genius”

(June 22, 1947- February 24, 2006)

Octavia Estelle Butler

Octavia Butler, a writer of science fiction, brought elements of African and African-American spiritualism, mysticism, and mythology to her novels and stories.

Octavia Estelle Butler was born an only child on July 22, 1947, in Pasadena to a housemaid Octavia Butler and shoeshine man Laurice. Her father passed away when she was a baby, so she was raised by her grandmother and her mother. As a girl, she was known as Junie, derived from “Junior” since her mother was also named Octavia. Butler’s mother worked as a maid to provide for the family after her father died, but nonetheless they continued to struggle in a poor but racially mixed neighborhood throughout her childhood. At the time, Pasadena was a more racially integrated city than others around the country. Still, Butler would later recount memories of blatant racism her mother endured at the hands of her employers — including racial slurs and not being allowed to enter residences through the front door.

Bulter grew up shy, losing herself in books despite having dyslexia. Bulter’s mom could not afford books, but she brought home the discards of the white families for whom she worked. Butler began writing when she was 10 years old.

Butler earned an associate’s degree from Pasadena City College in 1968, and later studied at California State University, Los Angeles. Over the years, Bulter would religiously get up each day at 2 a.m. to write.

Her novel, Kindred (1979), introduced the science fiction community to slavery in the United States through a narrative involving time travel, while Parable of the Sower (1993) raised questions about the environment, technology, theology, and metaphysics.

Butler’s Patternists series includes five novels published between 1976 and 1984, and investigates issues of gender and class identity within a society managed by an elite group of telepaths. Her Xenogenesis trilogy, including Dawn (1987), Adulthood Rites (1988), and Imago (1989), depicts the near destruction of the human world due to prejudice, class conflict, and violence.

In 1995 Octavia Butler was given a MacArthur Fellowship, the first science fiction writer to receive the award. She also received two Hugo Awards from the World Science Fiction Society and two Nebula Awards from the Science Fiction Writers of America.

Butler died on February 24, 2006, after falling and striking her head on a walkway outside her home in Lake Forest Park, Washington. Her books have been translated into 10 languages and have sold more than a million copies altogether.

References for post:

Historylink.org

Goldenstate.is

Latimes.com

Theguardian.com

Theportalist.com

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1st P.h.D in Chemistry

(April 16, 1921-October 28, 2003)

Marie Maynard Daly

The first African American woman to earn a Ph.D. in chemistry.

Marie M. Daly was born in 1921 in Corona, New York. Her parents inspired her passion for science; her mother fostered her love of books and her father passed on his love of chemistry. Before Marie was born, her father had enrolled at Cornell University to study chemistry, but ultimately had to leave due to a lack of money.

Marie’s parents were strong believers in education at a time when attending college was seen as impossible to many African Americans. As a woman of color, Marie overcame financial, gender, and racial hurdles. Hence, after graduating from Hunter College High School, an all-girls institution in New York City, Marie attended Queens College in Flushing, New York, where she majored in chemistry choosing to live at home in order to save money.

Marie graduated magna cum laude in 1942 with a Bachelor’s degree in chemistry and was offered a fellowship to pursue her graduate studies at New York University, whilst working part-time as a laboratory assistant at Queens College. Marie completed her Master’s degree in just one year.

In 1944, Marie enrolled at Columbia University as a doctoral student, where she undertook research into compounds the body produces and how these affect digestion. Working under the direction of Dr. Mary L Caldwell (the first female assistant professor at Columbia University), Marie completed her PhD with a thesis entitled “A study of the products formed by the action of pancreatic amylase on corn starch”.

In 1947, she became the first African American woman in the United States to be awarded a PhD in chemistry.

Dr. Daly made important contributions in four areas of research: the chemistry of histones, protein synthesis, the relationships between cholesterol and hypertension, and creatine’s uptake by muscle cells.

Dr. Marie Maynard Daly, whose pioneering research resulted in a new understanding of the relationship between high cholesterol and clogged arteries. In fact, Dr. Daly’s work helped to shape much of what we now know about the biochemical aspects of cardiovascular health, identifying the link between high cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease, which led to a better understanding of the causes of heart attacks.

Dr. Daly continued to teach and carry out pioneering research at Albert Einstein College, including the study into the effects of cigarette smoking on the lungs, until she retired in 1986.

Notably, Dr. Daly made significant contributions to the field of biochemistry while also advocating for increased enrollment of students of color in medical schools and science graduate programs. In honor of her father, she even created a scholarship program for minority students pursuing science degrees at Queens College.

In 1999, Dr. Marie Maynard Daly was recognized by the National Technical Association as one of the top 50 women in Science, Engineering and Technology.

Dr. Daly died on October 28, 2003.

Dr. Marie Maynard Daly’s impact on future generations of scientists extends far beyond her scientific contributions—her memory continues to inspire individuals from all walks of life to pursue careers in STEM.

Reference for post:

sciencehistory.org

undark.org

blackpast.org

africanamericanscientist.com

1st to Gold

Alice Coachman

(November 9, 1923–July 14, 2014)

Alice Coachman Davis was an American athlete and the first black woman to win the Olympic gold medal in high jump.

Alice Coachman was from Albany, Georgia, the fifth child of Fred and Evelyn Coachman’s ten children. Coachman grew up in the segregated South. Barred from public sports facilities because of her race, Coachman used whatever materials she could piece together to practice jumping to develop as an athlete.

Coachman received encouragement from her fifth-grade teacher, Cora Bailey, at Monroe Street Elementary School and from her aunt, Carrie Spry, who defended her niece’s interest in sports in the face of parental reservations.

In 1938, when Coachman enrolled in Madison High School, she immediately joined the track team. The Madison boys’ track coach, Harry E. Lash, recognized and nurtured her talent. She quickly attracted the attention of the Tuskegee Institute, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where she enrolled in the high school program in 1939. Even before classes started, she competed in and won her first Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) national championship in the high jump.

That day she broke the AAU high school and college women’s high jump records while barefoot. She won the AAU outdoor high jump championship for the next nine years, also winning three indoor high jump championships. Coachman excelled in the sprints and basketball as well; competing at Tuskegee Institute from 1940 to 1946. There she won national track and field championships in the 50 and 100-meter dashes, the 4 X 100 meter relay, and the running high jump; and as a guard, she led the Tuskegee basketball team to three consecutive conference championships.

At Albany State College in Georgia, Coachman continued high jumping in a personal style that combined straight jumping and the western roll technique.

At the 1948 Olympics in London, her teammate Audrey Patterson earned a bronze medal in the 200-meter sprint to become the first Black woman to win a medal.

In the high jump finals Coachman leaped 5 feet 6 1/8 inches (1.68 m) on her first try. Her nearest rival, Britain’s Dorothy Tyler, matched Coachman’s jump, but only on her second try, making Coachman the only American woman to win a gold medal in that year’s Games.

Altogether she won 25 AAU indoor and outdoor titles before retiring in 1948.

In 1952, she became the first African American woman to sponsor a national product, after signing an endorsement deal with Coca Cola.

Coachman’s post-Olympic life centered on teaching elementary and high school, coaching, and working briefly in the Job Corps. She also taught physical education at South Carolina State College, Albany State College, and Tuskegee High School. Coachman retired from teaching in 1987.

Coachman was one of 12 torchbearers for the Atlanta Olympic games in 1996. She was also inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1997 and the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 2004.

Alice Coachman died on July 14th, 2014 in Alabama.

References Researched for Post:

Blackpast.org

Olympic.org

Aaregistry.org

Biography.com

Britannia.com

The Past is Present: What’s Going On?

Rocking back

to an invisible

chair

Marvin Gaye

singing

Mercy, Mercy, Mercy Me…

breezing

into

1971

years in a day

wearing

shades

looking

into

gray polluted

skies

and

green algae oceans

of

2018 Today,

brutality

and

picket signs

sway

back and forth

to

What’s Going On…

rallies on there

way

No understanding,

No pay,

clear visions

to see

We ALL Wanna Holler

Save the Children

from

the past

Inner City Blues…

for

We all Lose

our

FUTURE.

Auntie Knows…

Throwback requested by my nieces and nephews striving for their dreams. Keep pushing…Auntie love you. ✌&💖 JGomez

A gifted blessing

of Love

watching

you

grow to

Succeed

Humbly

to the

highest

degree.

Curious

of those

whose face

looks

you

up and down

from your head

to your toes

to be in

your business

to used thee.

Dream

riders

self-esteem

killers

Too many

judges

holding on

to nasty

grudges

living their life

stirring up

strife.

Be confident

with yourself

within yourself

for

Your life’s

journey

not

what others

expected to see.

STAR

Throwback: Dedicated To Anyone who believes they’re a Star, but hasn’t seen their shine yet.

Brights lights

hit your face

shinning and stunning

away your fears.

Haters

still talk

but, not to your ears.

Years of hard work

showing the world

your worth

setting your

own levels

fighting your

inner devils

hiding your

blemishes and scars,

for a shining perfection imagine

of who you are…

A powerful

Bright

Star!

It’s Not Over

When you have said all you can say,

and done all that you can do,

remember that GOD is watching over you.

He has seen your tears and heard your cry,

things will get better, to get you by.

When times are hard and you can’t see your way,

God will lead you every step through your day.

Give him your cares and your worries too,

seek and you will find

God,

always have time for you.

This poem is written especially for Tammy7711– God’s Angel. She never knows what I am going thru but, at the right time she comes thru sharing God’s love thru encouragement, prayer and support. BE Inspired Be God Inspired. Share the love and check out her blog @Godinspiredart.wordpress.com